News briefing – week beginning 01 January

  • An alleged drug trafficker suspected of brokering deals between Colombian terrorists and drug traffickers and Mexican transnational criminal organisations, Hermes Alirio Casanova Ordoñez, has been arrested by officials of the Colombian National Army.
  • 339kgs of cocaine paste, used in the production of cocaine, were discovered by Honduran security forces in the Caribbean port of Puerto Cortes, hidden in 2,852 wooden sticks originating from Colombia.
  • 13 pounds of cocaine valued at J$8.4 million were seized as four people were arrested by officials of the Jamaican Transnational Crime and Narcotics Division (TCND) in the island’s two major airports.
  • Police allege that the Kirriemuir ATM raid in Scotland was perpetrated by organised criminals.
  • 400 people were arrested in over 4 countries following a joint investigation by Eurojust and Europol resulting in the dismantling of a major heroin trafficking network in the EU.
  • The UN advocates for reforms in Afghanistan in the fight against the drug trade to ensure the country’s security as Syria reaffirms its commitment to combating the drug trade.
  • Four men have been arrested following the discovery and seizure of £300,000 by NCA officials in connection with an Albanian-led money laundering network.
  • The UK is expected to set up a multi-agency specialist team within the NCA to tackle bribery as part of its approach to tackle corporate crime.
  • 81 suspected drug traffickers have been arrested by officials of the NDLEA over the last 12 month in Kwara state, Nigeria.
  • Home Office figures reveal that cannabis is the most seized drug in the North Eastern part of the UK.
  • Gangs are allegedly exploiting the rise of online markets for trafficking illegal drugs resulting in increased sales.
  • Authorities in Germany have seized 33kgs of cocaine hidden in a shipment of unroasted coffee shipped from Brazil.
  • Cocaine valued at £20,000 was seized following a police raid in Hednesford, UK.
  • Superman ecstasy pill deaths have been blamed by some on punitive drug policies in the UK.